A Brief Analysis of “Overpass” by Ada Limón

I greatly related to the poetry collection The Carrying, by Ada Limón. I understood her struggle with conceiving and reproduction, as I’ve had my own losses, and that connection with death is prevalent throughout each poem. The strongest of poems, and with many layers, is a reflection from years past.

In Limón’s “Overpass”, there’s a subtle reference to how proximity to death allows you to reevaluate your life and see how death intrudes in even the smallest moments. “I don’t think I worshipped/ him, his deadness, but I liked the evidence/ of him, how it felt like a job to daily/ take note of his shifting into the sand” shows an almost morbid fascination with how things change. An obsession with how death changes you and how you see the world. Initially, there’s an unadulterated curiosity about the world and its possessions. The search for “a bottle top, a man’s black boot, a toad” and then, without much effort on the narrator’s part, the inevitable find of death and transformation. 

This change is also alluded to in the first line when the narrator says “the road wasn’t as hazardous then”. On first pass, this line could be read as literal change, a time before new construction in the town. It could also be deeper, referencing a time when the narrator was innocent, before she experienced death and loss, and before the roads to healing and understanding (the whys of it all) were less “hazardous”. I don’t think it too far of a reach to interpret how the narrator’s “bendy girl body” was once pliable, before it failed or experienced the overhaul of adulthood and the risks of pregnancy and miscarriage. It feels that there, through language and imagery, the narrator discovers a monotonous connection with how one might “check on [him] each day” as you would a fetus, at risk of being unborn.


Usually, I am not a poetry reader, but this collection and how someone who has been through what I’ve gone through “carries grief” drew me in. I hope to share more thoughts with you as I read more of The Carrying.

Link to “Over Pass”

Good Readdance,
Jade

P.S. I initially wrote this for a very short essay for my Hispanic Women Writers course but continued it into a blog post because I felt connected to it? I’m not sure. But I hope you follow the link and read the poem and enjoy it, and The Carrying, as much as I did. If you are interested in reading more posts like this just let me know. I never know these days!

P.S.S. As I have the book and didn’t take this from the link, here’s the citation.

Limón, Ada. “Overpass.” The Carrying, Corsair Poetry, 2018, pp 38.

Taking A Break From Social Media

So I’ve discovered that the hardest thing to do is find time between work, school, luxury and hobbies. It’s hard because now there are so many other things taking up our time and mind. I’ve seen so many studies, and I wont go into the gory details, about how much time we, as humans, spend on our phones. It doesn’t only include phones though! Many people like to lift their noses and say “Well, I don’t spend all day on my phone!” or “I put my phone down during dinner.” It’s not just that. There are TV’s, Mac/laptops, tablets, IPads and now even watches that take away from our quality time with each other.

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I am no different. I spend a lot of my time surfing the internet, trudging through Facebook or taking selfies for my Instagram or Snapchat accounts (those to be listed below!). After seeing a post, that was completely ridiculous, on FB I actually sat and thought about the time that I spend using these medias. Then, after spending a few days reading a book because I was so distracted, I decided to take a break. I need to get more reading done, so I can get more reviews done! Yay (aren’t you excited!?)!! I want to watch more movies and tv shows. I want to take longer walks without checking my phone as soon as I get home to see if anyone liked a status. I also want to find my center and start doing yoga more. I definitely used to do it a lot but have seriously been slacking on that front!

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From 4/24/2017 until 5/24/2017 I am doing, what I call, the Break Free From Media experiment (#BreakFreeFromMedia or #BFFM!). You may wonder why it’s an experiment or why it seems like a big deal but it truly is for me! After moving to my area just over a year ago I still feel like I haven’t completely incorporated myself into the “scene”. Using social media is definitely a way I bridge that gap.

I will only be using this site (as it’s my review blog and not what I would call social media…weird I know) and my professional Instagram page (which is obviously for professional purposes only). You guys should make this move with me!! Would you take a break from your social media? Or do you believe you can’t live without it? Let me know what you think!

Jade

P.S. My anniversary with my guys is coming up soon…boy am I excited!

Links are also on the side of the screen 🙂

Instagram– JadeElyzabethJ

SnapChat- BlackIceQueen

Book Review: The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks

I must admit, I was pleasantly surprised by this novel. Not because I dislike Nicholas Sparks and not because I’m not privy to cowboy romance but because it read beautifully. Now, you might say that a well written novel comes as no surprise from an author like Nicholas Sparks. You might say that this is something you would expect from him. You might even say that the novel turned cinema aspect should already give some insight into the greatest of this novel. I say, I try and look at each book written as a stand alone novel. Just because the first two or three novels in a series were great or just because an author has a plethora of best sellers under his belt doesn’t exactly mean that he will continue to wow.

I must say that there were a few moments when I thought the novel was entirely too long. I admit there were a few places where I wanted to skip ahead and get to the next tasty morsel. Overall the novel is a great read, a good romance and could fit in a category of “must read”‘s. It wasn’t bogged down with repetitive words, sentences or descriptions that stretched on and on.

The structuring of the novel seems like it would be confusing as it is told with chapter headings from different perspectives. I didn’t have a hard time jumping back and forth. The author really integrating each section into the next regardless of whose eyes we were looking through. The end did have a sort of choppy like separation. It seemed a little rushed, as if to just complete the novel. I saw one or two moments when the book could have ended and the reader would’ve been just as satisfied.

I look forward to reading more novels by Nicholas Sparks!

Jade

The Longest Ride on Amazon