Book Review: The Word is Murder and The Sentence is Death by Anthony Horowitz

The Word is Murder: A wealthy woman strangled six hours after she’s arranged her own funeral.
A very private detective uncovering secrets but hiding his own.
A reluctant author drawn into a story he can’t control.

The Sentence is Death: Richard Pryce, found bludgeoned to death in his bachelor pad with a bottle of wine – a 1982 Chateau Lafite worth £3,000, to be precise. Odd, considering he didn’t drink. Why this bottle? And why those words? And why was a three-digit number painted on the wall by the killer? And, most importantly, which of the man’s many, many enemies did the deed?

Heya,

I discovered The Word is Murder and The Sentence is Death while looking for another book by the author Anthony Horowitz. It made all of my little girl fantasies come true. I grew up obsessed with romance novels (and their many subgenres) but when I was in seventh grade I came across my first mystery novels. I fell in love with detective stories, murder mysteries – I’d even throw psychological thrillers in there. Arthur Conan Doyle, Agatha Christie, Mary Higgins Clark, John Grisham (because everyone needs a good lawyer mystery) and more.

I also fell in love with the idea of becoming a cross between Sherlock Holmes and Indiana Jones. I wanted to be a professor with a messenger bag and a magnifying glass. I loved the idea of solving crimes, deciphering codes, and pulling apart the mysteries of life. Through the novels by Horowitz, I found that. He puts himself in the book as an actual character. A Watson to Hawthorne’s Sherlock and I absolutely love it.

I love that the books are in first person and you feel like the mystery is unfolding before you. The fact that Hawthorne is an anti-hero with few redeeming qualities, and the fictional Horowitz is slowly becoming a sleuth in his own right (because everyone knows Watson was also a bit of a genius) makes me love the books even more. I have to say plural because I enjoyed both books the same. Often times, when you read a sequel you think ‘hhmm…this doesn’t seem like it has the same PUNCH as the first one’ but it does!

After reading the first book I knew what to expect and so I often found myself trying to find clues in the second book as I went alone. It was absolutely fantastic.

I saw that the second book The Sentence is Death came out in 2019 and the first was 2 years prior. I’m really hoping, seriously hoping, that there is another book coming out in the series next year. I can’t wait to find out what happens next.

If I had to give these books stars I would do 4.5 for both of them! So I definitely recommend you reading them! If you do, let me know in the comments how you liked them.

Link to Books

P.S. If you have any other suggestions for me please let me know in the comments!

Good Readdance,
Jade

Book Review: The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware

When she stumbles across the ad, she’s looking for something else completely. But it seems like too good an opportunity to miss—a live-in nannying post, with a staggeringly generous salary. And when Rowan Caine arrives at Heatherbrae House, she is smitten—by the luxurious “smart” home fitted out with all modern conveniences, by the beautiful Scottish Highlands, and by this picture-perfect family.

What she doesn’t know is that she’s stepping into a nightmare—one that will end with a child dead and herself in prison awaiting trial for murder.

Read: August 2020

Method: Audiobook

Heya,

I’ll admit, I wasn’t impressed with the synopsis for The Turn of the Key by Ruth Ware. I’ve been playing hide and seek with this novel for months. I usually use Overdrive for my audiobooks and I kept seeing that it was available for lending but I never requested it. I really enjoyed -in a dark, dark, wood – by the same author and I was partially afraid that nothing would live up to that novel. I even put it back on my TBR (To Be Read) pile so that I can read it again. It was that good. I also enjoyed The Death of Mrs. Westaway ( and heck, I might just have to write a cumulative review on this author one day because I’m sure I’ll read more novels by her).

Lately, I’ve been struggling to find a novel that I wanted to read – that isn’t Stephen King, as I’ve been reading a ton of books by him this year. Stay tuned for a review set of his novels – and so I was like FINE!!!! I requested The Turn of the Key and started listening.

I will admit, again, it started slow for me. I had strapped on my bluetooth headphones before I left the house to go shopping and thumbed through the available audiobooks on my homescreen. I tried out two or three audiobooks but it wasn’t until I was standing in Dollar Tree, looking for candy, that I started TTotK. Then, as it began I rolled my eyes. Previous bias. Then I realized that the narrator is British (is the author British?) and I usually love that and so I decided to let it continue.

I was pleasantly, VERY PLEASANTLY, surprised to discover that the book is amazing. The narrator and the low way she says “creak, creak, creak” and how the emotion of a scared nanny comes across through every chapter. I loved the way the story is told in second person, structured as a letter written to a solicitor. I enjoyed the way it unfolds, from in-scene-prose to reader, and back. I also thought that the way the ending is handled – no spoilers here – it was genius! I was about 20 minutes away from ending the novel and I was like OH NO! PLEASE TELL ME ____ HAPPENS! I had predicted what would happen early on, but not some aspects,  and yet, I was happy with the way everything unfolded. So I’ll say, I easily enjoyed it.

The pacing of the novel made me want to listen to it straight through, though it was 10 hours, and so I did. I think I took one small break in the middle to watch a recipe for dinner. Then I was back at it. It was more than emotion from the narrator and pacing. On a sentence level, with phrases and the genius of metaphors, Ware made me feel connected to this character who lived in a different place, narrated by a different culture.

 

If I had a rating system I would give this an amazing 3.5 out of 5 stars! Thank you, Ruth Ware, for yet another great story.

Jade

Link to Book!

If you have any books you’d like to recommend I read, feel free to comment them below!
theturnofthekey

Book Review: The Shadows by Alex North

You knew a teenager like Charlie Crabtree. A dark imagination, a sinister smile–always on the outside of the group. Some part of you suspected he might be capable of doing something awful. Twenty-five years ago, Crabtree did just that, committing a murder so shocking that it’s attracted that strange kind of infamy that only exists on the darkest corners of the internet–and inspired more than one copycat.

 

Read: August 2020

Method: Audiobook and Physical (Mostly listened)

One of the great things about The Shadows by Alex North is that it was inspired by the Slender Man legend. I must admit that before I read this book I read a few articles interviewing the author as well as about the Slender Man. It’s a morbid curiosity as well as an interest in the role legends and myths play in society. It all made me giddy inside. 

I listened to The Shadows in one day, willing to sacrifice sleep in order to keep listening. I loved the narrator, the way you could feel the emotion from the main characters and the mystery. I feel that narrators should really get the kudos they deserve because you truly believe that the person is the character. The inflections of Paul, the worries of Amanda, the spooky woods, all come through because of the phrasing and the tone of the narrators. So, bless them! That being said, I felt that this book was much slower than The Whisper Man (another book by Alex North that I read recently). I felt that I kept waiting for things to really take off. This anticipation wasn’t fulfilled until later in the book but it was worth the wait. I just wished that there was more of a sense of urgency earlier on. I also felt that I might’ve missed something, regarding the timeline of deaths, while listening. Due to this, I spent the last half of the book looking for answers that I never got. This makes me feel like I need to reread the book, or at least search for that answer via Goodreads or reviewers (because others might’ve had the same question). 

I feel that even wanting to find those answers shows just how much I liked this book. The fact that despite this hiccup, I still want to learn more about the novel, as well as read more about Slender Man, says it all. I would definitely recommend The Shadows to anyone looking for a mystery. If I had a rating system, I would give this book a 3.5 out of 5 stars! Fantastic!    

Jade

Link to Book!

If you have any book suggestions you’d like me to read, comment them below!

theshadows

 

Book Review: Them Bones by Carolyn Haines

No self-respecting lady would allow herself to end up in Sarah Booth’s situation. Unwed, unemployed, and over thirty, she’s flat broke and about to lose the family plantation. Not to mention being haunted by the ghost of her great-great-grandmother’s nanny, who never misses an opportunity to remind her of her sorry state–or to suggest a plan of action, like ransoming her friend’s prize pooch to raise some cash.

But soon Sarah Booth’s walk on the criminal side leads her deeper into unladylike territory, and she’s hired to solve a murder. Did gorgeous, landed Hamilton Garrett V really kill his mother twenty years ago? And if so, what is Sarah Booth doing falling for this possible murderer? When she asks one too many questions and a new corpse turns up, she is suddenly a suspect herself…and Sarah Booth finds that digging up the bones of the past could leave her rolling over in her grave.

 
Heya!!

So I felt really bad. Past tense. I saw a suggestion for this book and quickly requested it from the library. I preceded to keep the book for a month and a half. Started accruing library fees and I didn’t even realize it. At the time, we’d just moved from the old apartment and I thought I had packed all the library books in the same box. Not true.

Anyway, so by the time I found it and opened it, I already had an $8 library fine. YIKES! So, of course I thought, I might as well read it now. I practically own it.

So I did. And it was glorious. I was so happy with this book that I read it all in one day. Well into the night. I then looked up the sequel to request. Unfortunately, I forgot to turn it in for three more days. ARGH!

 

thembones

 

So basically, I really liked it. I liked the character development, the mystery, the coziness (har har har) and the pacing. I’m a big fan of cozy mysteries and I didn’t know it! I like to giggle and sense suspense at the same time. Who knew?

If you’ve read this book, liked it, disliked it, hated it or haven’t read it (or listened to it) yet but plan to…let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear your thoughts. If you have any book suggestions or any reviews you’d like to see here, let me know!

Good Readdance,
Jade

Link To Book

Book Review: You Will Pay by Lisa Jackson

It starts as a prank—a way to blow off steam after a long summer at Camp Horseshoe. Among the teen counselors, tensions and hormones are running high. No wonder the others agree when Jo-Beth Chancellor suggests they scare Monica O’Neal a little . . . or a lot. Monica has it coming, and no one will really get hurt. What could go wrong?
Everything. That summer, two young girls went missing.
Each one knows something about that terrible night. Each promised not to tell. And as they reunite, a new horror unfolds. First come texts containing a personal memento and a simple, terrifying message: YOU WILL PAY. Then, the murders begin.
It started years ago. But it will end here—as a web of lust, greed, and betrayal is untangled to reveal a killer waiting to enact the perfect revenge.

 

This was another one of those books that I read fairly quickly. I had forgotten how much I liked to read books by Lisa Jackson.  She writes mystery with just a hint of romance. In this book, you follow a sort of contorted ‘who done it’. You get the comparison of the characters when they were young and impressionable and them as adults when they have had a chance to put the past behind them. There are a few twists and turns in the story that were pretty exciting and unexpected.

lisa jackson

I will say this book is longer than I expected it to be. I think it could have been shorter and we still would’ve gotten the same level of character development. Some parts did drag on just a bit. This may just be me though, with my attention span and the fact that I have so many books to read so I really have to be very invested in every chapter.

I would recommend this book if you are looking for a quick mystery read. If you’ve read this book, liked it, disliked it, hated it or haven’t read it yet but plan to…let me know in the comments! I’d love to hear your thoughts. If you have any book suggestions or any reviews you’d like to see here, let me know!

 

 

Good Readance,

Jade

Book Review: I’ll Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark

 “Almost two years after someone snatched Alexandra “Zan” Moreland’s then three-year-old son, Matthew, from his stroller while his sitter dozed, Zan, a New York City interior designer who remains devastated, has been unable to trace her son. To make matters worse, somebody is using her credit cards to purchase expensive items just as she’s on the verge of landing a prestigious account for her fledgling business. Worst of all, evidence emerges that suggests Zan kidnapped her own son. Meanwhile, a priest is troubled by a woman whose confession reveals that a murder is being planned. Contrivances that prevent key information from reaching the heroine as well as characters without personality in the service of a plot with at least one major hole won’t please those who prefer their suspense firmly grounded in reality and logic.”*

 

It almost happened again. I almost let it happen again. It t’was the night before Christmas…just kidding. It was about 2am this morning and I started to read an e-book that was recommended to me earlier in the day and then I thought, Crap! I need to read those damn library books! So I went to the large stack sitting on my dinning room table and picked up I’ll Walk Alone by Mary Higgins Clark. I got into the book and it took me until, around, 4am to finish it.

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I thought the book was pretty great, although there were some parts that really annoyed me. It’s already established from the first moment that someone is impersonating her and that most won’t believe it but she spends the majority of the book acting like a crazy person. She often asks herself if she really did have something to do with her son’s disappearance. Of course, I expected her to be upset, frustrated, exhausted and even a little unhinged but the dramatics was an unnecessary addition to the plot twist.  I feel as if we didn’t answer most of the questions (lotta worry, lotta call backs with no pay off; thinking of the Stephen King suspense method).

I am always a fan of hers but I definitely pay attention to each book as it’s own separate work. I must say, I did enjoy the plot twist in this one. It wasn’t as explosive as some of her other stories but I enjoyed it. I’d recommend this book if you just need something to curl up with or a quick read with a little suspense.

If you’ve read this book, if you liked it, disliked it, hated it or haven’t read it but have plan to…let me know! I’d love to hear your thoughts. And if you have any book suggestions for me to read or any reviews you’d like to see here, let me know!

Happy Reading.

Jade

 

*Link to Book and synopsis: http://bit.ly/2CTpnPG

Book Review: Loves Music, Loves To Dance by Mary Higgins Clark

Hi!

So I am beyond excited to do a review on this novel! When I was in private school I found myself as a definite outcast amongst the other students. You might say that it was because I didn’t come from a rich family like many of the others and that i just didn’t relate to them in anyway. The honest answer is just that I was very shy back then. I didn’t really know a lot of people and wasn’t very good at making friends.

You might’ve guessed, I spent most of my childhood with my nose stuck in chapter books. The majority of the books I read were romance novels. I  was caught up in the whirlwind of what it meant to be in love, the tug and war of the relationships and how the heart comes together. Then it was like the flood gates of everything amazing opened and rained down on me. I came across a novel by Agatha Christie and my heart swelled. All things mysterious, intriguing and thriller flowed out. I was referred to read Mary Higgins Clark by a teacher and I was skeptical. Agatha was the only step I’d taken to broadening my horizons and I balked at the idea.

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I fell in love with her style of writing. I had no idea what I was in store for. A few days ago I found one of her novels in a thrift store and I instantly knew I had to buy it! The story was one of my favorite in all of the books and genres I’ve ever read. The entire time I was on the edge of my seat. I literally jumped up, screamed and did a little dance when the killer was revealed. It was a really great story!

It was basically like reliving my childhood, curling up and unable to put the book down. I was angry, at one point, that the other characters in the story weren’t paying attention. I screamed “pay attention” at least ten times! To my hearts content, there was even a romantic storyline at play!

You have got to read this novel!

Good Readdance!

Jade